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DR. MAE JEMISON TO LAUNCH LOOK UP AT 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF SPACEFLIGHT CELEBRATION

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DR. MAE JEMISON TO LAUNCH LOOK UP AT 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF SPACEFLIGHT CELEBRATION

New Initiative to Connect and Inspire People Globally over the Year Culminating in a Day to LOOK UP Global Special Event

LOS ANGELES, September 15, 2017 – Tonight, Dr. Mae Jemison the world’s first woman of color in space will oversee the launch of the LOOK UP worldwide initiative during the celebration of the 25th anniversary of her spaceflight in 1992. 

LOOK UP over the next year will connect people worldwide, from all walks of life, culminating on a single day in August 2018 when everyone will be asked to LOOK UP and share what they see and their thoughts, hopes, fears, dreams and ideas for best path forward.  LOOK UP is a day, 24 hours, we acknowledge our oneness as Earthlings and concurrently our right to be a part of this greater universe.

Why LOOK UP?  “It is critical that we realize that worldwide, that all our lives and well-being are inextricably woven into the fabric of this planet Earth and globally connected to the greater universe,” Jemison stated.  “This is not a choice; it is a reality.  Whether we as a species survive, progress and thrive depends upon how we embrace this reality.”

Notables signing onto the goals of LOOK UP with Jemison, an engineer, physician, social scientist and NASA’s first African American woman astronaut, include:  LeVar Burton; Nichelle Nichols; Jill Tarter, Ph.D.; Halfu Osumare, Ph.D.; Amy Millman and Springboard Enterprises; MAKERS; Bayer Corporation; Scholastic, Inc.; 100 Year Starship; and, Yuri’s Night.

LOOK UP is purposefully designed to build momentum and evolve as individuals and organizations around the globe are connected, propose and develop LOOK UP activities in schools, workplaces, communities and nations that will highlight what they learn from the sky.  The LOOK UP platform will facilitate these activities and the creation of a tapestry of the images, observations and activities that are woven together and can be accessed globally.  The LOOK UP website, www.lookuponesky.org will “go live” tonight and individuals and groups are urged to sign up to receive updates, challenges, opportunities and news, as well as to become part of the LOOK UP global community.

Dr. Jill Tarter points to the fascination of the recent solar eclipse that swept North America and reminds us that “For millennia, across the world humans have looked to the sky to navigate their world.  We live both under one sky here on Earth and within the greater universe.  And while part of Earth, it is important to push to explore farther and to claim a place in the larger cosmos.”

Jemison and colleagues from 100 Year Starship have been developing LOOK UP for over a year and believe it is critical in the world today to offer this platform to engage people across cultures, nations and economies in order to facilitate understanding and contributing to our shared future.  To LOOK UP and build a better, robust path forward that includes and benefits us all.

LeVar Burton explains LOOK UP, “Let’s take one day to LOOK UP and recognize that we share not just the same origins, but the same sky.  And a growing ambition to be mature enough to leave home. LOOK UP and join the movement.”

ABOUT MAE JEMISON, M.D.

Audacious and pioneering, polymath Dr. Mae Jemison is a leading voice for science, social responsibility and innovation.  Jemison leads 100 Year Starship®, a global initiative that is pushing the frontiers of space exploration – ensuring human interstellar travel in 100 years.  The world’s first woman of color in space, she is committed to applying advance space technology to enhance life on Earth.  Dr. Jemison draws upon her experience as a physician, inventor, environmental studies professor, science literacy advocate, development worker in Africa and founder of two tech start-ups.  Recently, LEGO announced her as one of five Women of LEGO NASA kit.  She is the 2016-2017 Poling Chair at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.  A member of Fortune 500 boards, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, Dr. Jemison was voted one of the top seven women leaders in a presidential ballot straw poll and was the first astronaut to appear on Star Trek. Dr. Jemison lives in Houston and is still learning important life lessons from her cats.

For more information, visit www.drmae.com.

Find Dr. Jemison on social media:

Twitter:  @maejemison

ABOUT 100 YEAR STARSHIP™

100 Year Starship™ (100YSS) is building a global community to ensure that the capabilities for human interstellar travel beyond our solar system exist as soon as possible, and definitely within the next 100 years.  An independent, non-governmental, long-term initiative, 100YSS was started in 2012 with seed-funding through a competitive grant from DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) to foster the type of explosive innovation and technology and social advances born from addressing such an audacious challenge.  To bolster such innovation, 100YSS has programs and projects include research and innovation, across the physical and social sciences, the arts, entrepreneurship and education.  Based in Houston, 100YSS collaborates with international organizations, companies, universities and individuals including affiliate in Brussels, partnerships in Africa and Asia.

For more information, visit www.100yss.org.

Find us on social media:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/100YearStarship

Twitter: @100YSS

INCLUSIVE EVENT MARKS DR. MAE JEMISON’S HISTORIC SPACEFLIGHT


Jemison’s Silver Anniversary Party, 25 Strong! Celebrates Inclusion, Innovation, Science, the Arts and Social Responsibility in Los Angeles Under the Space Shuttle Endeavour at the Samuel Oschin Pavilion


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LOS ANGELES, SEPTEMBER 6, 2017 – This September is the 25th anniversary of NASA astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison’s spaceflight making history as the nation’s first African American female and the world’s first woman of color in space.  For many worldwide, Dr. Jemison’s launch changed the face of science and exploration, and was a major milestone in women’s, civil and human rights.

People from around the globe – all ages, races, ethnicities and genders—will come together to celebrate Dr. Jemison’s journey, accomplishments and commitment to the future at the 25 Strong! gala. This spectacular evening of inspiration, music, art, dance, knowledge-sharing and magic will take place under the Space Shuttle Endeavour, Samuel Oschin Pavilion at the California Science Center, 700 Exposition Park Dr., Los Angeles, on Friday, September 15, 2017 from 6:30 p.m. to midnight.

The 25 Strong! gala will kick off a yearlong anniversary of special events, one of which – an inspirational new initiative connecting individuals worldwide – will be announced that evening. 

A few of the notables attending the gala include U.S. Congresswoman Maxine Waters; Star Trek’s Nichelle Nichols; Jill Tarter, co-Founder of the SETI Institute; George Whitesides, CEO of Virgin Galactic; Jennie Yeung, President and Founder of the Beautiful Life Development Plan Foundation, Shanghai, China; Peggy Brookins, President of the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards; Sarah Toulouse, Executive Director of the Bayer USA Foundation; and, Hugh Roome, President of Consumer and Professional Publishing at Scholastic, Inc.  25 Strong is thrilled that Grammy-nominated singer, songwriter and musician Aloe Blacc will perform, as well as Kenji Williams, composer, director and founder of the award-winning space images powered earth-from-space show, Bella Gaia. Major sponsors are Bayer Corporation, Scholastic, Inc. National Geographic and Ford Motor Company.

“Dr. Jemison’s remarkable achievement has touched the lives of countless people around the world. We wanted to celebrate the inspiration she has been with an event that embodies her life philosophy: showing what is possible when we bring together the extraordinary – space exploration – with compassion, creativity and social commitment,” said Loretta Whitesides, Co-Creator of Yuri’s Night and chairperson, 25 Strong! Committee.  “It is a moment to rededicate ourselves to creating an inspiring future for humanity.”

Dr. Jemison, a physician, engineer, entrepreneur, and educator currently leads the global 100 Year Starship® initiative.  She is a pioneer and leading voice in advancing in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, raising public awareness of STEM education and increasing science literacy worldwide.  Dr. Jemison was living in Los Angeles when she was selected for the astronaut program.  The celebration party will be under the Endeavour, the same shuttle she flew on in space.

“I can think of no more important responsibility to mark the past 25 years than to share what I have learned and all that we might achieve if we include and welcome everyone to benefit from and be a part of the challenge and wonder of space exploration,” Dr. Jemison said.  “We are connected and inextricably part of this Earth; yet as we push to explore space and claim a place in the greater cosmos, it will enable us to build a better home, here, for everyone.“

Individual ticket prices range from $300 – $2,000.  For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit www.25strong.com.

About Mae Jemison, M.D.

Audacious and pioneering, polymath Dr. Mae Jemison is a leading voice for science, social responsibility and innovation.  Jemison leads 100 Year Starship®, a global initiative that is pushing the frontiers of space exploration – ensuring human interstellar travel in 100 years.  The world’s first woman of color in space, she is committed to applying advance space technology to enhance life on Earth.  Dr. Jemison draws upon her experience as a physician, inventor, environmental studies professor, science literacy advocate, development worker in Africa and founder of two tech start-ups.  Recently, LEGO announced her as one of five Women of LEGO NASA kit.  She is the 2016-2017 Poling Chair at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.  A member of Fortune 500 boards, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, Dr. Jemison was voted one of the top seven women leaders in a presidential ballot straw poll and was the first astronaut to appear on Star Trek. Dr. Jemison lives in Houston and is still learning important life lessons from her cats.

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@maejemison

Dr. Mae Jemison's 25th Celebration

NFL Commissioner, GE Chairman To Kick Off 1st And Future Event At Super Bowl LI

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Roger Goodell and Jeff Immelt, partners in the GE-NFL Head Health Initiative, will take part in a discussion on innovation and sports safety to kick off the annual start-up competition

By Texas Medical Center | January 25, 2017

The National Football League (NFL) and the Texas Medical Center (TMC) today announced that NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell and GE CEO and Chairman Jeff Immelt will kick off 1st and Future, the league’s annual Super Bowl start-up competition, at the TMC Innovation Institute in Houston, Texas, on Saturday, February 4, at 9:00am. Moderated by TMC President and CEO Dr. Robert C. Robbins, the conversation will focus on marketplace disruption through industry partnerships and open-innovation challenges.

In 2013, GE and the NFL debuted the Head Health Initiative, which invited innovators and entrepreneurs from around the world to develop solutions that would make concussion diagnosis faster and more reliable and improve treatment for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

Each year, the NFL partners with technology and innovation leaders in the Super Bowl host city to recruit startup companies with technology to advance player safety and performance. The 2017 1st and Future competition at TMC will focus on innovations that advance sports technology and athlete safety.

Startups have submitted entries in three categories—Communicating with the AthleteTraining the Athlete and Materials to Protect the Athlete—for the chance to pitch their innovation to competition judges in front of an exclusive audience, including NFL team owners and executives and representatives from the Houston Super Bowl Host Committee and the Texas Medical Center.

Scott Hanson of the NFL Network and host of NFL RedZone, will emcee the pitch competition, and the panel of judges will include:

The NFL and TMC will select up to nine companies from the three categories to compete in Houston. One winner from each category will receive a $50,000 check from the NFL to further develop their innovation; acceptance into TMCx, TMC’s world-renowned program for start-ups; and two tickets to Super Bowl LI.

TMC will livestream the full 1st and Future event—including the discussion between Commissioner Goodell and Jeff Immelt—on the TMC website as contestants compete in the following three categories:

For information on the competition’s selection criteria and official rules, visit www.tmc.edu/1st-and-future/.

 

 

Dr. Mae Jemison Reads the Letter Written by John Glenn to Honor Jeff Bezos for Blue Origin at the 2016 Ingenuity Awards

Breaking News: New Found Goldilocks Habitable Planet Brings 100 Year Starship Mission to the Forefront

One Star Over, a Planet That Might Be Another Earth

By Kenneth Chang Aug. 24, 2016

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An artist’s impression of the planet Proxima b orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest star to Earth’s sun.

Credit M. Kornmesser/European Southern Observatory

 

Another Earth could be circling the star right next door to us.

Astronomers announced on Wednesday that they had detected a planet orbiting Proxima Centauri, the closest neighbor to our solar system. Intriguingly, the planet is in the star’s “Goldilocks zone,” where it may not be too hot nor too cold. That means liquid water could exist at the surface, raising the possibility for life.

Although observations in recent years, particularly by NASA’s Kepler planet-finding mission, have uncovered a bounty of Earth-size worlds throughout the galaxy, this one holds particular promise because it might someday, decades from now, be possible to reach. It’s 4.2 light-years, or 25 trillion miles, away from Earth, which is extremely close in cosmic terms.

One astronomer likened it to a flashing neon sign. “I’m the nearest star, and I have a potentially habitable planet!” said R. Paul Butler, an astronomer at the Carnegie Institution for Science and a member of the team that made the discovery.

Guillem Anglada-Escudé, an astronomer at Queen Mary University of London and the leader of the team that made the discovery reported in the journal Nature, said, “We know there are terrestrial planets around many stars, and we kind of expected the nearby stars would contain terrestrial planets. This is not exciting because of this. The excitement is because it is the nearest one.”

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Beyond the planet’s size and distance from its parent star, much about it is still mysterious. Scientists are working off computer models that offer mere hints of what’s possible: Conditions could be Earthlike, but they could also be hellish like Venus, or cold and dry like Mars.

There is no picture of the planet, which has been designated Proxima b. Instead, Dr. Anglada-Escudé and his colleagues detected it indirectly, studying via telescope the light of the parent star. They zeroed in on clocklike wobbles in the starlight, as the colors shifted slightly to the reddish end of the spectrum, then slightly bluish. The oscillations, caused by the bobbing back-and-forth motion of the star as it is pulled around by the gravity of the planet, are similar to how the pitch of a police siren rises or falls depending on whether the patrol car is traveling toward or away from the listener.

From the size of the wobbles, the astronomers determined that Proxima b is at least 1.3 times the mass of the Earth, although it could be several times larger. A year on Proxima b — the time to complete one orbit around the star — lasts just 11.2 days.

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Although the planet, lost in the glare of the star, cannot be viewed by current telescopes, astronomers hope to see it when the next generation is built a decade from now.

 

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Proxima Centauri, which is in the constellation of Centaurus 4.2 light-years from Earth.

ESA/Hubble & NASA

 

And the planet’s proximity to Earth gives hope that robotic probes could someday be zooming past the planet for a close-up look. A privately funded team of scientists and technology titans, led by the Russian entrepreneur Yuri Milner and the theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, have announced Breakthrough Starshot Initiative, a project to develop and launch a fleet of iPhone-size spacecraft within two to three decades. Their proposed destination is the Alpha Centauri star system, which includes a pair of larger sunlike stars in addition to Proxima Centauri.

“We will definitely aim at Proxima,” said Avi Loeb, a Harvard astronomer who is chairman of an advisory committee for Breakthrough Starshot. “This is like finding prime real estate in our neighborhood.”

This newly discovered planet is much closer to its parent star, about five million miles apart, than Earth is to the sun, 93 million miles. Even Mercury, the innermost planet of our solar system, is 36 million miles from the sun.

While Proxima b might be similar to Earth, its parent star, Proxima Centauri, is very different from the sun. It is tiny, belonging to a class of stars known as red dwarfs, with only about 12 percent of the mass of the sun and about 1/600th the luminosity — so dim that it cannot be seen from Earth with the naked eye.

Thus Proxima b, despite its closeness to the star, receives less warmth than Earth, but enough that water could flow on the surface. Whether the planet has liquid water or an atmosphere is “pure speculation at this point,” Dr. Anglada-Escudé said in a news conference.

If the planet formed close to the star, it could be dry and airless, but it might also have formed farther out and migrated inward to its current orbit. It is also possible that the planet formed dry and was later bombarded by comets or ice-rich asteroids.

“There are viable models and stories that lead to a viable Earthlike planet today,” Dr. Anglada-Escudé said.

Even if it is habitable, scientists studying the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe spiritedly debate whether planets around these red dwarfs are a promising place to look.

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Small stars are more erratic, especially during their youth, and eruptions off the star’s surface could strip away the atmosphere from such planets. Levels of X-rays and other high-energy radiation bombarding the planet would be 100 times that on Earth, the scientists said.

The close orbit suggests that the rotation of the planet would probably be gravitationally locked by the star’s pull. Just as the same side of the moon always faces Earth, one side of Proxima b is likely eternally bright, always facing the star, while the other is ever dark.

Additional visible light observations further convinced the scientists that they were not being fooled by variations in the star itself erroneously mimicking the presence of a planet.

The discovery was more than a decade and a half in the making. Michael Endl, an astronomer at the University of Texas and one of the authors of the Nature paper, peered at Proxima Centauri for eight years beginning in 2000, looking for hints of a planet. “At that time, I didn’t see anything highly, highly significant,” Dr. Endl said in an interview. “Then we published our data and moved on.”

Later, Dr. Anglada-Escudé, analyzing data from a different instrument on a different telescope, found inconclusive hints of a planet. He reached out to Dr. Endl to reanalyze the earlier data, and he also spearheaded the Pale Red Dot project, which tried to observe Proxima Centauri every day for two months earlier this year.

The new observations clearly revealed the 11.2-day period of the planet, and the signal matched what Dr. Anglada-Escudé had suspected earlier. It also matched a signal that was hidden in the noise of Dr. Endl’s data, which was lower in precision and observed Proxima Centauri only once a week or so, not every day.

There are hints of perhaps another planet, perhaps more, but those hints are still ambiguous, the scientists said.

The discovery could provide impetus for planet-finding telescopes. Ruslan Belikov of the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., has proposed a small space telescope costing less than $175 million dedicated to the search for planets in Alpha Centauri. While it would not be powerful enough to spot Proxima b, its existence would give more confidence that terrestrial planets also orbit the two sunlike stars there.

“It just raises the public awareness there’s a new world just next door,” Dr. Belikov said. “It’s a paradigm shift in people’s minds.”

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Vist 100 Year Starship to learn more about Interstellar Travel http://100yss.org