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DR. MAE JEMISON TO LAUNCH LOOK UP AT 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF SPACEFLIGHT CELEBRATION

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DR. MAE JEMISON TO LAUNCH LOOK UP AT 25TH ANNIVERSARY OF SPACEFLIGHT CELEBRATION

New Initiative to Connect and Inspire People Globally over the Year Culminating in a Day to LOOK UP Global Special Event

LOS ANGELES, September 15, 2017 – Tonight, Dr. Mae Jemison the world’s first woman of color in space will oversee the launch of the LOOK UP worldwide initiative during the celebration of the 25th anniversary of her spaceflight in 1992. 

LOOK UP over the next year will connect people worldwide, from all walks of life, culminating on a single day in August 2018 when everyone will be asked to LOOK UP and share what they see and their thoughts, hopes, fears, dreams and ideas for best path forward.  LOOK UP is a day, 24 hours, we acknowledge our oneness as Earthlings and concurrently our right to be a part of this greater universe.

Why LOOK UP?  “It is critical that we realize that worldwide, that all our lives and well-being are inextricably woven into the fabric of this planet Earth and globally connected to the greater universe,” Jemison stated.  “This is not a choice; it is a reality.  Whether we as a species survive, progress and thrive depends upon how we embrace this reality.”

Notables signing onto the goals of LOOK UP with Jemison, an engineer, physician, social scientist and NASA’s first African American woman astronaut, include:  LeVar Burton; Nichelle Nichols; Jill Tarter, Ph.D.; Halfu Osumare, Ph.D.; Amy Millman and Springboard Enterprises; MAKERS; Bayer Corporation; Scholastic, Inc.; 100 Year Starship; and, Yuri’s Night.

LOOK UP is purposefully designed to build momentum and evolve as individuals and organizations around the globe are connected, propose and develop LOOK UP activities in schools, workplaces, communities and nations that will highlight what they learn from the sky.  The LOOK UP platform will facilitate these activities and the creation of a tapestry of the images, observations and activities that are woven together and can be accessed globally.  The LOOK UP website, www.lookuponesky.org will “go live” tonight and individuals and groups are urged to sign up to receive updates, challenges, opportunities and news, as well as to become part of the LOOK UP global community.

Dr. Jill Tarter points to the fascination of the recent solar eclipse that swept North America and reminds us that “For millennia, across the world humans have looked to the sky to navigate their world.  We live both under one sky here on Earth and within the greater universe.  And while part of Earth, it is important to push to explore farther and to claim a place in the larger cosmos.”

Jemison and colleagues from 100 Year Starship have been developing LOOK UP for over a year and believe it is critical in the world today to offer this platform to engage people across cultures, nations and economies in order to facilitate understanding and contributing to our shared future.  To LOOK UP and build a better, robust path forward that includes and benefits us all.

LeVar Burton explains LOOK UP, “Let’s take one day to LOOK UP and recognize that we share not just the same origins, but the same sky.  And a growing ambition to be mature enough to leave home. LOOK UP and join the movement.”

ABOUT MAE JEMISON, M.D.

Audacious and pioneering, polymath Dr. Mae Jemison is a leading voice for science, social responsibility and innovation.  Jemison leads 100 Year Starship®, a global initiative that is pushing the frontiers of space exploration – ensuring human interstellar travel in 100 years.  The world’s first woman of color in space, she is committed to applying advance space technology to enhance life on Earth.  Dr. Jemison draws upon her experience as a physician, inventor, environmental studies professor, science literacy advocate, development worker in Africa and founder of two tech start-ups.  Recently, LEGO announced her as one of five Women of LEGO NASA kit.  She is the 2016-2017 Poling Chair at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.  A member of Fortune 500 boards, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, Dr. Jemison was voted one of the top seven women leaders in a presidential ballot straw poll and was the first astronaut to appear on Star Trek. Dr. Jemison lives in Houston and is still learning important life lessons from her cats.

For more information, visit www.drmae.com.

Find Dr. Jemison on social media:

Twitter:  @maejemison

ABOUT 100 YEAR STARSHIP™

100 Year Starship™ (100YSS) is building a global community to ensure that the capabilities for human interstellar travel beyond our solar system exist as soon as possible, and definitely within the next 100 years.  An independent, non-governmental, long-term initiative, 100YSS was started in 2012 with seed-funding through a competitive grant from DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) to foster the type of explosive innovation and technology and social advances born from addressing such an audacious challenge.  To bolster such innovation, 100YSS has programs and projects include research and innovation, across the physical and social sciences, the arts, entrepreneurship and education.  Based in Houston, 100YSS collaborates with international organizations, companies, universities and individuals including affiliate in Brussels, partnerships in Africa and Asia.

For more information, visit www.100yss.org.

Find us on social media:

Facebook: www.facebook.com/100YearStarship

Twitter: @100YSS

INCLUSIVE EVENT MARKS DR. MAE JEMISON’S HISTORIC SPACEFLIGHT


Jemison’s Silver Anniversary Party, 25 Strong! Celebrates Inclusion, Innovation, Science, the Arts and Social Responsibility in Los Angeles Under the Space Shuttle Endeavour at the Samuel Oschin Pavilion


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LOS ANGELES, SEPTEMBER 6, 2017 – This September is the 25th anniversary of NASA astronaut Dr. Mae Jemison’s spaceflight making history as the nation’s first African American female and the world’s first woman of color in space.  For many worldwide, Dr. Jemison’s launch changed the face of science and exploration, and was a major milestone in women’s, civil and human rights.

People from around the globe – all ages, races, ethnicities and genders—will come together to celebrate Dr. Jemison’s journey, accomplishments and commitment to the future at the 25 Strong! gala. This spectacular evening of inspiration, music, art, dance, knowledge-sharing and magic will take place under the Space Shuttle Endeavour, Samuel Oschin Pavilion at the California Science Center, 700 Exposition Park Dr., Los Angeles, on Friday, September 15, 2017 from 6:30 p.m. to midnight.

The 25 Strong! gala will kick off a yearlong anniversary of special events, one of which – an inspirational new initiative connecting individuals worldwide – will be announced that evening. 

A few of the notables attending the gala include U.S. Congresswoman Maxine Waters; Star Trek’s Nichelle Nichols; Jill Tarter, co-Founder of the SETI Institute; George Whitesides, CEO of Virgin Galactic; Jennie Yeung, President and Founder of the Beautiful Life Development Plan Foundation, Shanghai, China; Peggy Brookins, President of the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards; Sarah Toulouse, Executive Director of the Bayer USA Foundation; and, Hugh Roome, President of Consumer and Professional Publishing at Scholastic, Inc.  25 Strong is thrilled that Grammy-nominated singer, songwriter and musician Aloe Blacc will perform, as well as Kenji Williams, composer, director and founder of the award-winning space images powered earth-from-space show, Bella Gaia. Major sponsors are Bayer Corporation, Scholastic, Inc. National Geographic and Ford Motor Company.

“Dr. Jemison’s remarkable achievement has touched the lives of countless people around the world. We wanted to celebrate the inspiration she has been with an event that embodies her life philosophy: showing what is possible when we bring together the extraordinary – space exploration – with compassion, creativity and social commitment,” said Loretta Whitesides, Co-Creator of Yuri’s Night and chairperson, 25 Strong! Committee.  “It is a moment to rededicate ourselves to creating an inspiring future for humanity.”

Dr. Jemison, a physician, engineer, entrepreneur, and educator currently leads the global 100 Year Starship® initiative.  She is a pioneer and leading voice in advancing in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields, raising public awareness of STEM education and increasing science literacy worldwide.  Dr. Jemison was living in Los Angeles when she was selected for the astronaut program.  The celebration party will be under the Endeavour, the same shuttle she flew on in space.

“I can think of no more important responsibility to mark the past 25 years than to share what I have learned and all that we might achieve if we include and welcome everyone to benefit from and be a part of the challenge and wonder of space exploration,” Dr. Jemison said.  “We are connected and inextricably part of this Earth; yet as we push to explore space and claim a place in the greater cosmos, it will enable us to build a better home, here, for everyone.“

Individual ticket prices range from $300 – $2,000.  For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit www.25strong.com.

About Mae Jemison, M.D.

Audacious and pioneering, polymath Dr. Mae Jemison is a leading voice for science, social responsibility and innovation.  Jemison leads 100 Year Starship®, a global initiative that is pushing the frontiers of space exploration – ensuring human interstellar travel in 100 years.  The world’s first woman of color in space, she is committed to applying advance space technology to enhance life on Earth.  Dr. Jemison draws upon her experience as a physician, inventor, environmental studies professor, science literacy advocate, development worker in Africa and founder of two tech start-ups.  Recently, LEGO announced her as one of five Women of LEGO NASA kit.  She is the 2016-2017 Poling Chair at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.  A member of Fortune 500 boards, the National Academy of Medicine and the National Women’s Hall of Fame, Dr. Jemison was voted one of the top seven women leaders in a presidential ballot straw poll and was the first astronaut to appear on Star Trek. Dr. Jemison lives in Houston and is still learning important life lessons from her cats.

Social Media Channels

Twitter: 

@maejemison

Dr. Mae Jemison's 25th Celebration

NASA Launches the Galaxy’s Most Glorious Space Database

Now you can easily peruse more than 140,000 of the agency’s photos, videos and visualizations

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smithsonian.com

Space is full of eye candy: exploding stars, nebulas of every shape and size, bizarre alien worlds. Though few will ever have the chance to see these breathtaking sights in person, it just got even easier to feed your space needs online thanks to a new, searchable database from NASA.

As Nilima Marshall reports for PA Science, the agency just made it even easier to peruse and even download more than 140,000 photos, renderings, audio files and videos it has online. Metadata is also available for those in need of a data fix along with all that visual splendor.

The site is easy to search and browse, and lets you look at the agency’s newest uploads and the most popular images. Trending now are the most recent “blue marble” photo, mind-boggling nebulae glimpsed by the Spitzer Space Telescope last year, a waving astronaut mid spacewalk, and this inexplicably majestic photo of a baby owl.

There’s a catch: In a press release, NASA warns would-be browsers that its site is “not comprehensive,” but rather showcases the best the agency has to offer from its gigantic archive. That’s okay, though—with over 140,000 pictures to gawk at and download, there’s plenty to keep you occupied. And since NASA constantly updates its publicly available images with both new and archival holdings, you’re unlikely to get bored any time soon.

It’s not the first time the space agency has delighted the public with vast releases of information. Just this month, NASA unleashed its entire 2017-18 software catalog at NASA Software, which lets the public use NASA-developed code for free. Offerings include the Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model, which lets users model things like temperature and wind, and an augmented reality iPad program called NASA Flywheel on the off chance that you’re working on ways to better store energy produced by the rotating cylinders called flywheels.

NASA isn’t just serious about space—the agency is also committed to keeping the public up to date on what it’s doing, making results of NASA-funded projects available to the public.

So go ahead: Soak up some space.

 

After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists

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Mae Jemison addresses congressional representatives and distinguished guests at Bayer’s Making Science Make Sense 20th anniversary celebration in 2015.

Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense

At the Oscars this weekend, one spotlight will shine on African-American women in the space race, thanks to the movie Hidden Figures, which is nominated for three Academy Awards, including best picture.

Mae Jemison made history in this field as the first African-American woman in space, as part of the crew on Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1992.

Jemison tells NPR’s Ari Shapiro she welcomes this new interest in women and minorities who broke boundaries in space because those people were previously excluded from the narrative.

“Well, I think it’s one of those things that really needs to be done,” Jemison says. “And this is because people of all types have made contributions across the spectrum of the sciences, across the spectrum of space exploration, and they have been left out many times, purposefully.”


Interview Highlights

 

On being the first African-American woman in space

I always think of it as like, “What do you do with your place at the table?” If you act just like everyone else, what difference does it make that you’re there?

And so for me — having grown up on the South Side of Chicago going to public schools, having been a medical doctor, having worked in Cambodian refugee camps as well as being an engineer as well as being someone who was very versed in dance and the arts — yes, I’m supposed to bring those perspectives to bear on the questions that we ask about space exploration.

How do we get more people involved? How do we understand how the various technologies can help benefit people across the world? Those were important things for me, so I was aware of that, yet at the same time, you have a job to do.

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Mamoru Mohri and Mae Jemison walk together after arriving with the rest of the STS-47 crew on Sept. 9, 1992, at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Chris O’Meara/AP

On encouraging more women and minorities to enter math and science

I think that there are really important things that we have to do with students to get them to succeed in science, to go on and stay with careers. And that includes the idea of being exposed to something.

So if you know that those things exist, it makes it easier for you to get involved. For example, it helps to know what an engineer is. It helps to know what a biotechnician is, so you’re not afraid of it.

Then, it’s experience. When you do hands-on science, you learn to — you learn about electricity by wiring a flashlight. And then it’s expectation. And that expectation is, we should expect our kids to succeed and to achieve. Children live up or down to our expectations. And so, I always call it the three E’s: experience, expectation and exposure.

On why efforts to diversify the field have not been more successful

So the efforts to diversify the pool, very often, are couched in things like, “We want them to behave and act like we do.” Or there are people who get degrees, and then they’re not included because … it’s a bevy of things. There’s no one single thing.

Let me give you the results of a Bayer Corp. survey as part of its Making Science Make Sense program. They surveyed women and minority members of the American Chemical Society. And what was found is that the place where these people had the most discouragement from studying science was in college by a college professor. Over 40 percent of them had that happen to them.

I want to make sure that that future that we’re creating is one that is the best it can be for people around the world, and also one that includes the full range of our talent and our skills — and you know, gender and ethnicity, geography — to solving the world’s problems.

Listen Here: http://www.npr.org/2017/02/22/516695456/after-making-history-in-space-mae-jemison-works-to-prime-future-scientists

Mirrors for My Daughter’s Bookshelf

Picture by: Giselle Potter

While fixing my 4-year-old daughter’s bookshelf, I noticed something missing on the glossy covers of her picture books: girls of color. There were talking cars, imaginary creatures and stories about white men, women and children. I started counting and discovered that only 4 percent of our books featured minorities as main characters, and only one was a black girl like my daughter.

I needed to do more than fix the bookshelf; I needed to remedy the contents.

It wasn’t that my daughter never heard stories featuring characters that look like her. I’m a kindergarten teacher, and I often borrow books with diverse characters from both the school and local libraries. But once I noticed the imbalance in our personal collection, I felt the books we actually owned should reflect her. The lack of representation should have been obvious much sooner, but I realized that as a white mother, white privilege afforded me a certain level of oblivion to the racial makeup of our book characters. Part of adopting transracially is learning what to pay attention to. As soon as I was aware of what was missing, I committed myself to filling our bookshelves with stories about smart, talented, strong black females.

In the mid 1960s, the children’s book editor Nancy Larrick found that the publishing houses putting out the most children’s books containing black characters still featured them less than 5 percent of the time (and not necessarily main characters or positive images). Ms. Larrick was among the first in children’s publishing to say that it was a problem for black children to learn about their world through books that do not represent them.

The diversity gap in children’s publishing persists today. Of children’s books published from 1994 to 2014, an average of 10 percent featured multicultural content, though that may be slowly increasing: The 2014 rate reached 14 percent. The campaign We Need Diverse Books was established in 2014 to advocate for more diverse representation in children’s literature. And in 2015, at age 11, Marley Dias started the Twitter hashtag #1000blackgirlbooks. Frustrated by the homogeneity of stories she read in class, Marley collected books featuring black girls to benefit underprivileged students.

The education professor Rudine Sims Bishop uses the metaphor of windows, sliding glass doors and mirrors to illustrate why diverse literature is so important. Books can be windows into worlds previously unknown to the reader; they open like sliding glass doors to allow the reader inside. But books can also be mirrors. When books reflect back to us our own experiences, when scenes and sentences strike us as so true they are anchors mooring us to the text, it tells readers their lives and experiences are valued. When children do not see themselves in books, the message is just as clear.

Of course, my daughter relates to characters for many reasons that have nothing to do with race. She identifies with Sal’s insatiable hunger for blueberries and Harold’s love of his purple crayon. Enamored by wild things at wild rumpuses, she dressed as Max for Halloween. In Louise Rosenblatt’s transactional theory of reading, individuals bring their own experiences to a text to understand and draw meaning from it. There are multiple ways to identify with a text and racially is only one. But if a child’s race or ethnicity is underrepresented in books, it says something about how those pieces of their identities are valued.

My daughter notices mirrors, not just in books, but all around her. Watching the ballerina Michaela DePrince, who lived through the civil war in Sierra Leone, perform in “The Nutcracker,” she exclaimed over the hushed audience, “I like the brown girl!” She notices equally when groups are underrepresented in certain roles. I once asked her to give her train ticket to the conductor and she replied, “That’s not a conductor, that’s a lady!” It was her first time seeing a female conductor.

For our updated bookshelves, I envisioned black female characters in many different roles. I wanted fairy tales and nursery rhymes; books about discrimination, civil rights, and social justice; fiction set in rural and urban places, in the United States and overseas; biographies of black female role models, and stories of black girls doing everyday things. I would need to shop.

But on a trip to a bookstore in New Jersey, where I lived at the time, not one picture book on display featured a female of color. Outward facing covers showed many white children, animals and personified objects, a handful of diverse boys, but no black girls. I thumbed through the shelves, pulling out spines one by one without luck.

“I’m looking for picture books featuring African or African-American females,” I told a saleswoman.

She didn’t know any titles offhand and said, “You can’t look up topics like that,” when I asked her to search her computer.

I looked up names online of diverse characters, authors and illustrators I knew as a teacher. I read reviews. I jotted down names of famous black women and searched for children’s literature featuring them. I checked winners of the Coretta Scott King Book Awards and those from the foundation started by Ezra Jack Keats, who is credited with breaking ground in 1962 with one of the first multicultural picture books, “The Snowy Day.”

The effects of incorporating these books into our collection were immediate. When my daughter saw a spaceship in an ad she said, “Oh! Mae did that,” referencing Mae Jemison, the first African-American woman to travel in space.

She told me that she was like Wangari Maathai, the Nobel Peace Prize winner, because, “When the trees were broken she planted new ones, and I love trees.”

My daughter befriended new characters. Jamaica from suburban America. Jamela from urban South Africa. Elizabeti in rural Tanzania. She loves their relatable problems: hurt feelings, accidental messes, losing a beloved doll.

I had set out to simply reattach the loose brackets of my daughter’s bookshelf. But I ended up installing mirrors, a much more needed repair.

Full Article: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/03/well/family/mirrors-for-my-daughters-bookshelf.html?_r=0