Many of the scientists and mathematicians who worked on the project that carried the U.S. into space, to the moon, and eventually to Mars, were women.Read More »


[STUDIO 360] Boldly Going Where No TV Prop Has Gone Before

Conservator Ariel O’Connor uses X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to determine what metal alloy was used to construct the port engine of the Enterprise model
(National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution
Apr 7,...Read More »

[Tech Insider] An Astronaut Planning A Mission To A Distant Star Shares 'An Unpleasant Truth I Have To Tell Everyone'

 

By: Kevin Loria

As a species, we have long looked to the stars. They have provided navigational guidance, spurred our imaginations, and inspired us to explore.

We are explorers who have spread around the world and are now reaching into space — to Mars soon, we hope, and beyond. Some of our...Read More »


[Fast Company] The First Black Female Astronaut On Fear, Audacity, And The Importance of Inclusion

[Photo: NASA via Wikimedia Commons]

By Lydia Dishman

June 2nd, 2015

SOURCE: Fast Company

On paper, Mae Jemison’s accomplishments are so varied and groundbreaking, you would never stop to consider that she—like most all of us— isn’t completely fearless.

Jemison studied chemical engineering at Stanford before going to medical school...Read More »


[Huffington Post] This Little-Known Quirk Makes Us Love Astronaut Mae Jemison Even More

By Jacqueline Howard

February 18, 2016

SOURCE: Fast Company

“Hailing frequencies open!”

That’s not only the classic line from “Star Trek” — recited by Lieutenant Uhura, a character played by African-American actress Nichelle Nichols — but it also was repeated by Dr. Mae Jemison, the first black woman to travel in space, at the start of...Read More »


[Auburn University] NASA Astronaut and Alabama Native Jemison to Speak on Importance of Inclusion

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By Vicky Santos

February 1, 2016

SOURCE: Auburn University

Mae Jemison, the first African American woman in space, will deliver the Extraordinary Women Lecture on Wednesday, Feb. 17, at 4 p.m. at The Hotel at Auburn University and Dixon Conference Center.

Jemison’s talk, “On Fear, Audacity, and the Importance of Inclusion,” the sixth in a...Read More »


[Tech Insider] The Biggest Thing Preventing Humans From Interstellar Space tTavel

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By Chris Weller

February 17, 2016

SOURCE: Tech Insider

Mae Jemison was 12-years-old when Americans first landed on the moon in 1969. The event inspired her, as it did an entire generation, and she went on to become the first woman of color who went to space, aboard NASA’s Space Shuttle Endeavor in 1992.

But...Read More »


[Fast Company] The First Black Woman In Space Wants To Take Us Beyond Our Solar System

By Jessica Leber

February 16, 2016

SOURCE: Fast Company

Mae Jemison was 12-years-old when Americans first landed on the moon in 1969. The event inspired her, as it did an entire generation, and she went on to become the first woman of color who went to space, aboard NASA’s Space Shuttle Endeavor in 1992.

But...Read More »


[Scientific American] Celebrating My Sheros: Dr. Mae Jemison

 

By DNLee

March 25, 2012

SOURCE: Scientific American

If you happened to read my Celebrating Ada Lovelace Day post from October 7, 2011, then you may have gleaned that I have this awesome fangirl obsession with THE Dr. Mae Jemison. As a young girl, I remember her being a member of the Space Shuttle...Read More »


[Huffington Post] The Space Age, Race and a Quiet Revolution

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By Dr. Mae Jemison

April 30, 2014

SOURCE: Huffington Post

In 1992, the Space Shuttle Endeavour made world history. I was on that flight, it was noted in the news: the first woman of color in space. When the Endeavour left the earth, the face of the space exploration changed.

When I...Read More »